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Why Honey for baby (0-12 months) is not good?

honey-for-babies

Honey is made by bees using nectar from flowers. it has been used as a folk medicine for centuries. Honey has been shown to have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. It also contains antioxidants that can help fight free radicals, but it also has some risks when given to babies younger than 1 year old.

Honey should neither be given to newborns nor infants/ babies till the age of 12 months.

 

Indian tradition at many places tells us that honey is fed to a newborn as soon he/she takes his first breath, but this practice has not been scientifically proven.

honey-for-babies

Most health experts agree that it is best to avoid giving honey to babies under 12 months old. That’s because honey may contain bacteria that can cause deadly disease botulism in babies/newborns/infants.

Giving honey to babies younger than a year can cause Botulism

Botulism is a rare but serious illness that can cause paralysis. Honey contains spores of a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism in babies.

While the risk of your baby developing infant botulism from honey is low, but it’s still best to avoid giving honey to babies because even if the honey doesn’t contain these spores, it can still contain bacteria that can cause other illnesses in young children. there are also other risks like improper digestion and flatulence caused by active sugars found in raw honeys. So, it’s best to avoid giving honey to infants.

Once your baby is a year old, honey is generally considered safe because at this age their digestive system has developed enough capacity for processing nutrients and carbohydrates found in honey.

You can introduce honey into your baby’s diet by adding small amount to porridge, cereal, or yogurt. Just be sure to give your child only pasteurised honey, as raw honey may contain harmful bacteria.

Honey is safe for older children and adults, but it’s important to make sure that the honey you’re eating is from a reputable source. honey can sometimes be contaminated with heavy metals or pesticides, so it’s important to buy honey from a trusted source.

We hope this article was informative and helpful. Please share it with your friends and family, especially if they have young children. And remember, honey should not be given to babies younger than 1 year old because it can cause botulism. If you have any questions or concerns, please call your baby’s doctor for further advice.

 

FAQs

1. Why shouldn’t honey be given to babies younger than a year?

Honey should not be given to babies younger than a year old because it can contain spores of Clostridium botulinum, a type of bacteria that can cause botulism in infants. Botulism is a rare but serious illness that affects the nervous system, and can be life-threatening if left untreated.

2. Is honey safe for older babies?

Honey is generally safe for older babies over 12 months of age, as their digestive systems are more mature and can handle the bacteria contained in honey.

3. How can I tell if honey is safe for my baby?

To tell if honey is safe for your baby, you should always buy pasteurized honey from a reputable source, as pasteurization eliminates the harmful bacteria that could make your baby sick. Additionally, it is best to avoid giving raw honey to your baby, even if they are over one year old, as raw honey may still contain trace amounts of these dangerous bacteria.

4. What are the risks of giving honey to a baby?

The primary risk associated with giving honey to an infant is the potential for botulism infection due to the presence of C. botulinum spores in some types of honey. Other risks include allergic reactions and an increased risk for dental cavities due to the high sugar content in some varieties of honey.

5. What are the symptoms of honey poisoning in babies?

Symptoms of honey poisoning in babies include constipation or diarrhea, weakness or drooping eyelids, difficulty swallowing or speaking, sudden changes in behaviour including irritability or restlessness, and loss of appetite. If any combination of these symptoms persists more than 24 hours after consuming a product containing honey then medical attention should be sought immediately as this may indicate botulism poisoning caused by C. botulinum spores found in some types of honey.

6. How can I treat honey poisoning in a baby?

Treatment for suspected cases of botulism poisoning typically involves hospitalization and administration of an antitoxin called BabyBIG® which must be prescribed by a doctor and administered intravenously within 72 hours after symptoms appear in order to reduce long-term damage from the illness and prevent death from muscle paralysis caused by the toxin produced by C. botulinum spores found in some types of honey consumed by infants under 12 months old .

7. What should I do if I think my baby has honey poisoning?

If you suspect your baby has consumed contaminated or raw honey resulting in possible poisoning then seek medical attention immediately as prolonged exposure can result serious health complications or even death due to muscle paralysis caused by the toxin produced by C.botulinum spores found only certain types of unpasteurized honey . It is important to inform your doctor about any products containing honey that have been ingested so appropriate testing and treatment can begin immediately upon diagnosis .

8. Are there any long-term effects of honey poisoning in babies?

Long-term effects from botulism poisoning caused by ingestion of contaminated or raw honey can include varying degrees of fatigue and weakness , difficulty breathing , paralysis , vision problems , memory difficulties , double vision , speech impairments , headaches , depression , anxiety , sleep disturbances , concentration difficulties , mental confusion and numbness or other sensory changes depending on how severe the case was before receiving treatment withBabyBIG®antitoxin medication .

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